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How does uncontrolled diabetes affect your daily life?

How does uncontrolled diabetes affect your daily life?

It can take work to get your diabetes under control, but the results are worth it. Uncontrolled diabetes means your blood sugar levels are too high, even if you’re treating it. And you may have symptoms such as peeing more often, being thirsty a lot, and having other problems related to your diabetes. If you don’t make…

What happens if you don’t get a handle on diabetes?

If you don’t make the effort to get a handle on it, you could set yourself up for a host of complications. Diabetes can take a toll on nearly every organ in your body, including your: Heart disease and blood vessel disease are common problems for many people who don’t have their diabetes under control.

What happens when a diabetes drug no longer works?

It works by decreasing the amount of sugar the liver produces and by making muscle cells more sensitive to insulin so sugar can be absorbed. If it no longer works for you, another drug can be added. “But there’s no magical second drug — the secondary options will depend on the individual,” she says.

Is it worth it to get Your Diabetes under control?

Controlling your diabetes is a daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly challenge, but the effort is worth it. Right away you’ll feel better and have more energy.The payoff?

It can take work to get your diabetes under control, but the results are worth it. Uncontrolled diabetes means your blood sugar levels are too high, even if you’re treating it. And you may have symptoms such as peeing more often, being thirsty a lot, and having other problems related to your diabetes. If you don’t make…

If you don’t make the effort to get a handle on it, you could set yourself up for a host of complications. Diabetes can take a toll on nearly every organ in your body, including your: Heart disease and blood vessel disease are common problems for many people who don’t have their diabetes under control.

Why do people not know they have diabetes?

You may not feel any symptoms from diabetes at first. That’s one reason why millions of people don’t know they have it. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and high levels of insulin (the hormone that manages blood sugar levels) start to damage your body silently, many years before you’re diagnosed with diabetes.

It works by decreasing the amount of sugar the liver produces and by making muscle cells more sensitive to insulin so sugar can be absorbed. If it no longer works for you, another drug can be added. “But there’s no magical second drug — the secondary options will depend on the individual,” she says.