Popular guidelines

Is it possible to go off blood pressure Meds?

Is it possible to go off blood pressure Meds?

If your physician doesn’t recommend going off your medication, ask him or her if you can be switched to a diuretic. If you don’t have your own blood pressure measuring device, buy one.

What to do if your blood pressure doesn’t go down?

The doc. put him on another medication which now makes 4 that he will take for one week. If the blood pressure does not go down they are gonna send him for a kidney test. My first question is what would cause someone’s blood pressure to stay high?

Are there any over the counter blood pressure meds that work?

Also, other drugs can interfere with blood pressure control, including pain relievers (NSAIDs), oral contraceptives and nasal decongestants. That’s why it’s good to bring all of your pill bottles, including over-the-counter medications or vitamins, to your appointments.

When did my doctor change my blood pressure medication?

Around 3 years ago, her medication seemed to be doing no good, so her doctor changed medications. The new one worked for a while, then her blood pressure creeped up again. After about a year of this, her doctor sent her to a cardiologist in a larger town. In September of 2007, and after 2 years of this problem, he finally admitted her for testing.

What happens if your blood pressure medication is not working?

Put another way: If you have high blood pressure, and you’re taking the maximum dose of three different blood pressure medications including a water pill (diuretic), and your blood pressure still isn’t at safe levels, you may have resistant hypertension. And you’ll need to do more to control it.

The doc. put him on another medication which now makes 4 that he will take for one week. If the blood pressure does not go down they are gonna send him for a kidney test. My first question is what would cause someone’s blood pressure to stay high?

Are there any over the counter medications that can make your blood pressure go up?

A variety of medications including prescription and over-the-counter drugs, can contribute to poor blood pressure control. Painkiller medications, especially NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) like ibuprofen and naproxen. Nasal decongestants. Oral contraceptives ( birth control pills ).

Around 3 years ago, her medication seemed to be doing no good, so her doctor changed medications. The new one worked for a while, then her blood pressure creeped up again. After about a year of this, her doctor sent her to a cardiologist in a larger town. In September of 2007, and after 2 years of this problem, he finally admitted her for testing.